Another great day of competition in the books. Even though the U.S. is a few gold medals behind China, the two countries are tied overall for number of medals won.  With so many events left that the U.S. should dominate in, I think our chances of winning the medal count looks pretty good.

Let’s start with women’s hoops. The U.S. proved to be too much for Angola and improved to 2-0 in  pool play. The Aussies on the other hand, didn’t fare too well. A a loss in overtime to France marked the first time since ’96 that Australia lost to someone other than the US. With the talents of Lauren Jackson though, I am sure they will bounce back strong.

What a match between number one and number two in women’s volleyball! I absolutely love watching these women compete and admire the strength and power they play with.  The U.S. won the first two sets behind the great play of Jordan Larson and Destiny Hooker. One might have thought that Brazil would have given up in the third, but when you are ranked second in the world, you know how to fight and come back, which is just what they did! That said, Brazil won the third set only to see the U.S. win the match in the fourth set.

On to a more serious and unfortunate matter: Social media seems to be taking over the world. In most cases, social media can be a great way to communicate and keep up with all the happenings around the world. On the other hand, people very often use it to say things they later regret. Recently, a female Greek athlete was suspended from participating in the Olympics by her country after making an offensive comment on Twitter about African immigrants in Greece. A Swiss male soccer player has also been suspended for a very racist and offensive comment he tweeted after the Swiss team lost to South Korea. After all of the time, sacrifices, and hard work you put into becoming an Olympian, why would you risk your chances of fulfilling your dream by posting something so offensive on a public forum? The Olympics are about showcasing the best talent, teams, and athletes from every country and competing at the highest level, not about showcasing poor sportsmanship. Both athletes later issued an apology after the suspensions, but in my opinion, the damage had already done. Maybe next time they will think before they speak (or tweet in this case).

Much love,
Sheryl
 

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