If you needed a reason to pop a bottle of champagne this weekend, we've got a really good one: "Revenge porn" king Hunter Moore, owner of the now-defunct revenge porn site Is Anyone Up?, has finally, finally, finally been arrested after more than two years of investigation by the FBI. Time magazine broke the news on Thursday that Moore, 27, and his partner, Charles "Gary" Evans, 25, have been indicted for 15 counts of conspiracy, seven counts of unauthorized access to a protected computer to ascertain information, and seven counts of aggravated identity theft.

Rolling Stone dubbed him "the most hated man alive." The Internet vigilante group Anonymous tried to hack him. Facebook tried to ban him permanently. PayPal tried to block him. One woman, after finding photos of her breasts online at Is Anyone Up?, showed up at Moore's house with her father and pleaded with him to take them down. When that didn't work, she stabbed him with a pen. (Moore told Rolling Stone his first thought upon being stabbed was, "This will be the best post ever!") Anderson Cooper had him on his show to talk to two of his female victims. Dr. Drew tried to get him to see the light. And still, no one and nothing could stop Moore. Is Anyone Up? remained online and updated until last year when Moore voluntarily sold it and claimed he had turned over a new leaf (his new resolve lasted about five minutes, and soon enough he was up to his old tricks again).

Why? Why did it take so long for the legal repercussions of his behavior to catch up to Moore? The answer is tricky.

For those not familiar with the term, "revenge porn" is a type of porn where people, most commonly ex-lovers, upload sexually explicit photos to the Internet without the consent of the photo's subject. In the age of Internet privacy, it remains a legal gray area. For example, it's not illegal for those over 18 to take nude photos of themselves or other people. Further, the photos belong to whomever took them and in whose posession they remain. Additionally, if the photos end up on foreign websites whose servers are located outside the U.S., they remain outside of U.S. jurisdiciton. Consequently, victims have very little legal recourse.

Moreover, most victims don't have the thousands and thousands of dollars that it would cost to file a civil suit, so many do nothing and hope that the photos will just go away. Not helping the matter is the overall mentality that the victims "had it coming" or "got what they deserved." For example, when Los Angeles resident Charlotte Laws and her 24-year-old daughter Kayla (who were both instrumental in the investigation against Moore) called the L.A. police department to report that Kayla's computer had been hacked and nude photos of her had been posted online, a police officer asked Kayla, "Why would you take nude photos if you didn't want them to end up on the Internet?" 

Moore has admitted several times that he "doesn't give a f*&&^%" about taking photos from sites such as Facebook and posting them to his site. He also claimed immunity by allowing users to submit photos of their friends, enemies, or ex-lovers as long as they signed a contract assuming legal responsibility for their actions, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is reporting. Moreover, Moore has long claimed to be protected by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which dictates that website owners cannot be held liable for content submitted by users.

Internet activitsts have been trying to take Moore down for years at this point, but very few states have existing, enforceable laws regarding revenge porn. In Moore's case, what may have happened is that he finally made a mistake: He allegedly sent at least one email to Evans instructing him to hack into victims' computers to obtain more photos and then posted them on his site, as well as paid Evans between $200 and $900 to do so.

There is a reason people say that the Internet is forever, and protecting yourself from revenge porn can be daunting. California is the only state that has an actual law on the books that criminalizes revenge porn, and it's limited in scope: The criminal has to have taken the photo in question, which means that many people—say women who take nude selfies and send them to a boyfriend, who then disseminates them—aren't protected. The Daily Dot reports that your best bet is to learn how to "game Google" so that you can better control what kind of content shows up attached to your name. They have some helpful tips here.

For more information or to read the full indictment against Moore and Evans, click here.

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