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5 Things the Oscars 2017 Best Picture Mess-Up Taught Us About Keeping Competition Classy

ICYMI, the biggest upset of the 2017 Oscars wasn't someone tripping on their gown's train—it was the giant cluster that happened when the much-anticipated award for Best Picture was given to the wrong movie. Presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway announced that the award went to La La Land when it was actually awarded to Moonlight.

The charade that occurred onstage in those few chaotic minutes (watch the whole thing here) was a serious lesson in classy sportsmanship. Whether you're competing for the highest Academy accolade or crushing a local 5K race, everyone involved (the casts and crews both movies, Beatty and Dunaway, and even Jimmy Kimmel) set an inspirational example on how to handle whatever hot messes, victories, and defeats life throws your way. (And that's not the only powerful statement that celebs made at this year's Oscars.)

1. The Moonlight crew was beyond chill about it.

They could've been pissed that their fairytale Oscar-winning moment got snubbed by a simple envelope mix-up—but instead, the Moonlight cast and crew was straight-up overjoyed. They showed nothing but love for the La La Land cast and crew: "I have to say, it is true, it's not fake. We've been on the road with these guys for so long, and that was so generous of them. My love to La La Land, my love to everybody" said Moonlight director Barry Jenkins. (Want more inspiration from Oscar nominees? These body-pos quotes will have you feeling the self-love.)

Then producer Adele Romanski took the stage to show even more love to the other Academy favorite: "I don't know what to say. I'm still not sure this is real. It is so humbling to be standing up here with hopefully still the 'La La' crew," she said.

2. La La Land producer Jordan Horowitz was the definition of gracious.

When you're faced with a WTF-situation, it can be easy to hide in the back corner and let someone else deal out the bad news or attempt right an awkward-AF wrong. But La La Land producer Jordan Horowitz stepped up immediately once he found out what happened, and oh-so-graciously handed the award off to the deserving Moonlight crew, saying "I'm going to be really proud to hand this off to my friends from Moonlight." The only thing better than being a gracious winner? Being a gracious winner-turned-loser.

3. Warren Beatty laid it all out there.

Even though it wasn't Beatty's fault he was handed the wrong envelope, he immediately stepped up to the mic to explain exactly what happened. He explained that the envelope was indeed a duplicate of the Best Actress envelope, so the card inside said that Emma Stone of La La Land won (hence, the confusion). Warren finished up by clarifying that, yes, Moonlight did really win, and held up the correct card: "This is Moonlight, the Best Picture."

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4. Jimmy Kimmel reminded us that shit happens.

Shortly after Horowitz stepped away, Kimmel, who was hosting, took the mic to do some damage control using plenty of comedic relief to chill the situation. Who does he blame for the biggest Oscars blunder ever? The only guy who's made a mistake of that magnitude: Steve Harvey. (Remember that time he announced the wrong Miss Universe in 2015?)

And again, when he took the stage to give the final sign-off, Kimmel switched the dialogue to make himself the brunt of the joke, saying, "I blame myself for this. Let's remember it's just an award show. We hate to see people disappointed, but the good news is we got to see some extra speeches, we have some great movies... I knew I would screw his show up, I really did... I promise I'll never come back."

5. PwC owns up to their mistake—and gave props to all the people on stage.

PricewaterhouseCoopers, the accounting firm in charge of all the top-secret ballot counting and fancy red envelopes issued an apology via Twitter at 3 a.m., apologizing for their role in the whole mix-up, and giving the on-stage celebs and crew a much-deserved bout of appreciation for handling it so well.

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