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Why Elisabeth Moss Actually Likes the Dark Circles Under Her Eyes

elisabeth moss

If you don't always get enough sleep (and that's, like, everyone), you know the puffy, dark-circle, undereye struggle is real. Thank goodness for concealer, right? But Elisabeth Moss, the star of Hulu's new series The Handmaid's Tale, recently said that her own undereye circles actually worked to her advantage during filming. (If you're struggling with yours, scope out these three insanely easy beauty hacks for getting rid of undereye bags.)

In Hulu's buzzy adaptation of Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel of the same name, Moss' character is supposed to look stressed and exhausted, mainly because she's dealing with some serious trials and tribulations—you know, like living in a society where women have no reproductive rights and having her daughter kidnapped by the government. In an interview with Yahoo Style, the actress said that one of her favorite parts of playing this character was that she didn't have to spend a lot of time in the makeup chair every day on set.

"If you're not sleeping a lot because you're working your [butt] off and you get dark circles and bags under your eyes—the more you have, the better," she told the site of the sleep deprivation effects during filming. "You're supposed to look stressed. In fact, one night I got sleep. I came in and my makeup artist was like, 'Oh dear,' and was disappointed that I didn't have the dark circles under my eyes that we needed." On that day, they actually used makeup to create the appearance of undereye bags in order to keep things consistent.

Pretty crazy, right? We're going to go ahead and say this is possibly the first time we've heard someone say that undereye circles were considered a plus. But it's always awesome to see the script flipped even if it is for a Hollywood role instead of real life. Plus, we're all about that #nomakeup life, and, let's face it, real women (heck, real people) have undereye circles. The more honest celebrities are about what they look like without makeup and retouching, the more young girls and other women will realize that what they see on TV, on social media, and in movies isn't exactly reality.

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