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Fitbit Has Officially Gone Wayyy Past Counting Steps

Fitbit diehards, it's time to get excited: The wearable tech experts announced the release of new gadgets, and let us tell you, they go way past tracking steps. Of course, most of 'em do by now, what with the ability to monitor heart rate and evaluate sleep habits, but the latest line of wearables is taking your health monitoring to a whole new level.

Oh, and you'll just happen to look super cute while doing it. Because a bulky wrist strap isn't exactly a look you're going for on date night or when you're walking into a big business meeting.

So here's the deal: The Flex 2 and Charge 2 are both new additions to the Fitbit fam, and they're basically souped-up versions of the original gadgets under the same respective names. Yes, the Flex 2 still counts your steps, but now it also gives you little reminders to make a move, vibrates when you have an incoming text or call, and recognizes different workouts to track (think lifting weights, running, and biking). It's also the brand's first waterproof tracker, meaning you can take it for a little dip in the pool and keep track of your laps—and leave it on while you shower after.

The Flex has always had some solid fashion designers behind it (remember when Tory Burch first announced her collab with Fitbit?), and now there's more where that came from. So whether you like good ole' Tory or Vera Wang for Kohl's and Public School are more your style, you can pretty much pick a design that works with your everyday fashion choices. 'Cause like we said, no one else needs to know what you're tracking.

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As for the Charge, which Fitbit says is their most popular wristband tracker, this new version has a screen display that's four times larger than the original, and now you can customize how you want your info shown (something the company says users were really begging for) and swap out the bands for more personalization. The continuous heart rate tracking carries over to this version, but kicks it up a notch by using that data to give you an estimate of your personal cardio fitness level, which they base off your estimated VO2 max (a score that's typically determined by a doctor's visit and testing done in a lab). After you have that info, the tracker will even spit out suggestions for how you can improve your score (and yep, you can track specific workouts, set up interval timers, and connect to GPS for deets on pace and time while sweating your heart out).

Our favorite part of the upgrade, though, is actually how it weaves in time for meditation. Since you know it can improve your health—and even your workout game—it makes sense that the company wanted in on the health trend. The Guided Breathing Sessions found on the Charge 2 are two or five minutes long, and the heart rate monitor helps determine your breathing patterns to cue you through each segment.

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Of course, Fitbit has other trackers in their arsenal, and those weren't left out in the cold this season. While the upgrades aren't quite as expansive, the Blaze and Alta will also have stylish new looks available, as well as a software update that gives you more vibrating notifications.

And if you're not in the market to upgrade to a brand new tracker, that doesn't mean you can't take advantage of the new app features. Fitbit Adventures is full of non-competitive challenges that take a cue from augmented reality (we see you, Snapchat and Pokemon Go). The company says there are more options to come (even a TCS New york City marathon route), but for now, there are three trails you can hike in Yosemite Park. And let us tell you, the virtual panoramas are so realistic that even if you're on the most boring dead-end street in your neighborhood, you'll feel like you're moving along the trail.

So, basically, Fitbit's got your back and is ready to get you excited (or keep you excited) about keeping tabs on your health. Everything's expected to drop this fall, but you can pre-order what you like on Fitbit's website right now. Early Christmas shopping, anyone?

 

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