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Top 7 Ways to Stay Hydrated on Long-Distance Runs

Carry a CamelBak

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Anita trains for races like Chicago's Rock 'n' Roll Half Marathon with her CamelBak (try the Charm 50 oz pack). "The water tube is so easy to grab off your shoulder and take a quick drink," she says. "Your run isn't interrupted at all." Try our running playlist for your own Rock 'n' Roll race.

Tap Into Free Water

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For Kathe, running is a great way to see her city, New York. She's tried lots of the water belts but prefers to carry a bottle and take advantage of the city's TapIt program. The website lists cafés throughout the city that welcome anyone passing by to fill their water bottle with tap water.

Join the Club: Group Water Stops

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Maureen often runs Chicago's Lake Shore Drive Path with running groups that offer water stops along the way. "But I've been in a few situations where part of a group gets lost or I get nervous about how far apart water stops are," she says, so she brings her Fuel Belt just in case.

Tote Your Bottle

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Tracie trains for half-marathons using a small water bottle with a hand-strap (the one shown here is from North Face). Her favorite race: the Brooklyn Half-Marathon. "You end at Coney Island and can jump in the ocean and then get a beer and a hot dog after the race!" Try our Half-Marathon Training Guide.

Get Hip: Fuel Belt

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Wynne runs everywhere from Austin to Denver while she continuously hydrates using her Fuel Belt. Her favorite event is her hometown's Evergreen Town Race in Colorado, a 10K/5K run/walk that passes right by her house.

Pave Your Way: Pre-Placed Bottles

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Nora's hydration method requires trustworthy neighbors. She places water bottles along her running route before setting off. It must work: Here, she's receiving her medal after completing her first full marathon in Disney World. Get more marathon running tips.

Find the Fountains

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Anna sometimes trains for her yearly half marathons by searching out routes with water fountains—a simple hydration solution that requires a few-second stop but can help you out in a pinch.



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