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10 Seriously Fit Chicks of CrossFit

Amanda Welliver

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Amanda Welliver is teaching her daughter from an early age the beauty of strong women!

"Just when my CrossFit feet were wet (six months into it), I found out I was pregnant. After months of patiently training during pregnancy, I was eager to recover and compete without thinking about my heart rate the entire time. No excuses now!"

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Annie Thorisdottir

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Annie Thorisdottir is currently ranked number one on the women's leaderboard, but this 22-year-old from Iceland does have one Achilles' heel—while she grew up doing gymnastics, dancing, and pole vaulting, she did "no ball sports, unfortunately!" Thankfully a woman who can back squat 253 pounds probably doesn't need to worry much about her free throws!

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Camille LeBlanc-Bazinet

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Canadian Camille LeBlanc-Bazinet, 23, has made CrossFit a family affair. "[I] started with my twin and then got all my family involved and now we are all addicts!"

Maybe all that support is what helped her rock out 80 pull-ups?

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Jenny LeBaw

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Jenny LeBaw, 30, is a California girl with a unique perspective on how to measure progress. "Some people measure their success by PR's on lifts, others by smashing their times on workouts... what about increased quad size? Team Clydesdale!"

What's her secret for making the top 20? "Recording workouts is key... do it!"

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Cheryl Brost

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41-year-old Oregonian Cheryl Brost proves that age really is just a number, as she routinely competes against—and beats—women half her age. Brost came in seventh in the 2011 Reebok CrossFit Games and is aiming to better her position this year.

Her best tip? Watch your nutrition. "I don't weigh and measure my food for every meal, but I do measure on a regular basis so I know exactly what 2 cups of veggies or 4oz of protein looks like."

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Michele Letendre

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Michele Letendre is a relative newcomer to CrossFit, but less than two years after her first competition, the 26-year-old Canadian is already ranked second among the women. She credits her success to two-a-day workouts, a morning workout doing a program developed by her coach called Give'm Cold Steel, followed by an evening CrossFit session.

Whatever she's doing is working, as the 5' 1" athlete can clean and jerk (a move where you pull a loaded barbell up to your chin and then push it over your head) an impressive 175 pounds—47 pounds more than she weighs!

Angie Pye

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Once a registered nurse and now a CrossFit trainer, Angie Pye says that CrossFit was "life changing." Even though the 36-year-old Canadian can run 5K in 22 minutes, it doesn't all come easy for her.

"[I'm] baby stepping my way to better eating all the time, but [I] battle some serious cravings!"

Another reason we love this fit chick? Her awesome sense of humor: "I love to "Tae Bo" people randomly. Not sure why, but it just feels right so I go with it."

Photo courtesy of CrossFit, Inc

Lindsey Valenzuela

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Lindsey Valenzuela says the trick to being a CrossFit athlete is a positive attitude. The 25-year-old Californian says she lives by the word "believe." "Because anything is possible as long as you believe you can and will accomplish your dreams!"

And we believe in anyone who can deadlift 365 pounds, nearly two and a half times her body weight!

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Denae Brown

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Australian Denae Brown, 32, says everyone at the Games has a CrossFit story, and hers has a happy ending. In 2011 she was working a steel salesperson but made a snap decision at a regional CrossFit competition that office life wasn't for her. "So thanks to CrossFit, I’m no longer stuck between four walls in an office selling steel… I’m now out there lifting it!"

Photo courtesy of CrossFit, Inc

Heather Welsh

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Heather Welsh, a 30-year-old mother of two, has learned to take a sensible approach to training, even when amping up her workouts to prepare for the Games.

"I always listen to my body. If I need a rest day, I will try to have an "active rest" day. When in a strength cycle, I need more days of rest. Yoga, I have found is the best thing I can do for a quick rehab."

Photo courtesy of CrossFit, Inc