You are here

10 Foods You Didn't Know You Could Freeze

Green Juice

1 of 10

All photos

Just take a swallow and pop the bottle back in the freezer—otherwise the juice will expand and leak. When you're ready to drink, let it thaw. Or you could pour the juice into popsicle molds and eat as a frozen treat. (But How Much Green Juice Is Too Much?

Photo: Corbis Images

Lettuce

2 of 10

All photos

There probably isn't much point to freezing regular supermarket iceberg. But the lettuce you grow yourself or pick up from a farmer's market is so tasty, it's a shame to throw out. Instead, puree your leftovers with a little water, pour into ice cube trays, and freeze. Then you can toss them into smoothies or soups for a hit of flavor and nutrients. (You can use this same method to freeze herbs, or just stick them whole in a freeze tray, cover with water, and freeze.)

Photo: Corbis Images

Avocados

3 of 10

All photos

Wash it, halve it, peel it, and either stick the halves into a freezer bag as they are or puree with a little lemon juice, then freeze. The texture won't be quite right when they thaw, but we promise your chilled out avocadoes taste great mashed on toast or in guac. (30 Awesome Avocado Toast Recipes.) 

Photo: Corbis Images

Grapes

4 of 10

All photos

If you haven't tried frozen grapes, do it now. You can toss them in white wine as mini "ice cubes,” but we prefer to eat them whole for the ice cream-like texture.

Photo: Corbis Images

Prosecco

5 of 10

All photos

Next time you open a bottle of Prosecco and only have a glass or two, keep the rest from going bad by pouring it into a freezer-safe container, adding some berries, and sticking in the freezer. Once it's frozen, scoop it into a bowl and eat like granita. (And check out The Best Wines for Your Waistline.) 

Photo: Corbis Images

Whole Tomatoes

6 of 10

All photos

Conventional wisdom warns against freezing tomatoes. Because they have a high water content, they turn into mush when they're thawed. While that's true, sometimes mushy tomatoes aren't necessarily a bad thing—like when you want to make pasta sauce, for example.

Photo: Corbis Images

Garlic

7 of 10

All photos

If you've never bought farm-fresh garlic, you don't know what you're missing. But those little bulbs sprout a lot faster than what you'd normally buy in the supermarket. (Though there is reason to hang onto Sprouting Garlic...) If you can get your hands on the fresh stuff, buy a big batch and put the extra, unpeeled, in the freezer. You can pry off and use cloves as needed.

Photo: Corbis Images

Cooked Grains

8 of 10

All photos

Quinoa, brown ice, barley—having cooked grains in the freezer is a lifesaver when you're trying to throw together a meal in a pinch. Just add a bit of water before thawing in the microwave to keep the grains from drying out.

Photo: Corbis Images

Hummus

9 of 10

All photos

Packaged hummus has a relatively long shelf-life, but the homemade stuff (like this tasty Avocado Pesto Hummus) spoils a bit quicker. To avoid wasting any of that goodness, transfer it into a freezer-safe container, then pour a super-thin layer of olive oil over the top, cover, and freeze. Let it thaw in the fridge—you'll have to stir it thoroughly and may want to add a little garlic or roasted peppers to amp up the flavor, but it'll be as good as new.

Photo: Corbis Images

Corn on the Cob

10 of 10

All photos

Wrap your corn, husks and all, in foil and toss into the freezer. But fair warning: This works best for super-fresh corn from a farmer's market. Supermarket ears, which tend to be lower quality, often get tough after some time in the freezer. You can try blanching them first, or removing the kernels. When you're ready to enjoy, let them thaw slightly then cook as usual.

Photo: Corbis Images

Comments

Add a comment