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Here's What You Need to Know About the Edamame Recall for Listeria

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Today in sad news: Edamame, a favorite source of plant-based protein, is being recalled in 33 states. That's a pretty widespread recall, so if you have any hanging around in your fridge, now would be a good time to toss it. Edamame (or soybean pods) sold by Advanced Fresh Concepts Franchise Corp. during the past few months may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, according to a statement released by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Yikes! (FYI, these are the plant-based diet rules you should be following.)

If you've never heard of this specific bacteria before, the main thing you need to know is that you definitely *don't* want to come into contact with it. Though the infection is most serious in babies and children, according to the Mayo Clinic, adults can experience symptoms such as fever, muscle aches, nausea, and diarrhea if infected. If the infection moves into the nervous system, symptoms can become more severe, including headaches, loss of balance, and convulsions. It's also especially important to avoid infection during pregnancy, since though the effects for the mother will likely be NBD, the impact on the baby can be severe—potentially even resulting in death before or after birth. What's even more scary about the infection is that it can take you up to 30 days after you've been exposed to show symptoms, meaning there may be some people out there who have it but don't know yet. Thankfully, so far there haven't been any reported illnesses related to this recall. (Related: You've Eaten Something from a Food Recall; Now What?)

So how can you protect yourself? The possible contamination was discovered during a random quality control testing, reports the FDA, and all edamame marked with the dates 01/03/2017 to 03/17/2017 could be affected. The edamame was sold at retail sushi counters within grocery stores, cafeterias, and corporate dining centers in the 33 affected states (check out the full list here). If your state is on that list and you've purchased edamame recently, you can contact the store where you bought it to find out if it's part of the recall. But when in doubt, just get rid of it. If you've already eaten edamame that could have been affected, keep a close eye on any potential signs of contamination and reach out to your doctor at the first sign of anything. Better safe than sorry, right? Plus, you can sub in tofu to get your soy fix.

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