You are here

DNA Testing Finds That Subway Chicken Is Half Chicken and Half Something Else

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) has recently found that Subway chicken in Canada is part meat and part, well, something else. Researchers analyzed six orders of chicken strips and seven pieces of oven-roasted chicken to find that only about 50 percent of the meat was actually chicken according to its DNA. And the rest? Mostly soy.

A Subway spokesperson responded:

We tested our chicken products recently for nutritional and quality attributes and found it met our food quality standards. We will look into this again with our supplier to ensure that the chicken is meeting the high standard we set for all of our menu items and ingredients.

That said, the fast-food giant did admit that though their meat is "made from 100 percent white meat chicken," their chicken strips and oven-roasted chicken "contain 1 percent or less of soy protein." "We use this ingredient in these products as a means to help stabilize the texture and moisture," they said in the same statement.

Subway wasn't the only restaurant of its kind to be targeted by the CBC. In partnership with Trent University and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, four other fast-food restaurants also had their chicken analyzed. A&W's Chicken Grill Deluxe, for example, averaged 89.4 percent chicken DNA, McDonald's Country Chicken came in at 84.9 percent, Wendy's Grilled Chicken Sandwich scored 88.5 percent, and Tim Hortons' Chipotle Chicken Grilled Wrap averaged 86.5 percent. Subway's oven-roasted chicken, on the other hand, only had 53.6 percent chicken, while the sweet onion chicken teriyaki was just 42.8 percent.

Overall, the report revealed that the fast-food chicken tested had "about a quarter less protein" than home-cooked chicken, and sodium levels "seven to 10 times what they would be in a piece of unadulterated chicken."

On the plus side, no one can ever call your chicken sandwich boring again, huh?

Subway has since tested the same chicken and found soy protein to be present in only 1 percent of the product. 

Comments

Add a comment