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How to Make Sheet Pan Eggs (and Why You Should)

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I'm a huge fan of frittatas, so when I heard about sheet pan eggs and spotted them popping up on Pinterest, I was sold before the first bite. (Love one-pan meals? Try these sheet pan dinners that make meal prep an absolute breeze.) Like frittatas, sheet pan eggs are virtually impossible to mess up, allow you to pack a ton of veggies into one dish, and are great for meal prepping. You'll definitely want to add this into your rotation for batch cooking for the endless variations. Eggs are also a great source of lean protein, with one extra-large egg clocking 7 grams of protein and only 80 calories. Using them as a base for a simple, healthy meal is a no-brainer. The best part is, once you get the basic recipe down, you can be creative and experiment your own additions.

The Basics

The folks at IncredibleEgg.org recommend using a quarter sheet pan (9×13×2) for a dozen eggs, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and 3/4 cup milk. Milk helps to make the eggs lighter, but you can omit it and still get great results. Whisk ingredients together, pour into a greased pan, and cook for 15 minutes or until set at 350°F. That's it.

The Variations

Here's where it gets fun: You can add any veggies, cheeses, or spices and herbs you want. If you're using firmer veggies, sauté them first. These are a few of our favorite takes on sheet pan eggs:

The Greek: Spinach, onions, feta, rosemary, and sage

Brunch in a Pan: Pour egg mixture over cooked shredded potatoes, top with cheddar

Slab Quiche: Pour egg mixture over a piecrust, crescent roll dough, or puff pastry

Egg Sandwich: Slice and serve on a bagel or English muffin (Try this smoked salmon and cream cheese egg recipe from The Everyday Epicurist, shown above.)

The Mediterranean: Stir pesto into the egg mix and add sun-dried tomatoes and Parmesan

The Tricks

Add water: I like to add a little bit of water to my frittatas to make them fluffier. The same trick works for sheet pan eggs—just add about a tablespoon to your eggs as you whisk them. This keeps them from getting that dense, gummy texture you probably remember if you ever had eggs at summer camp or in a cafeteria. Omit this if you already added milk to the recipe.

Slice and freeze: These freeze really well, which is perfect if you're cooking for one (and don't plan on finishing a whole pan in about five days). Just be sure to let them cool completely before cutting into squares and wrapping them in plastic wrap.

Think outside of breakfast: With a side salad and toast or crackers, this is a fast, easy dinner and super friendly to pack for lunch.

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