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Why (Healthy) "Unicorn Food" Is Everywhere

Despite what certain (abnormal) weather conditions may have you thinking, there's still a long way to go until spring—meaning that flowers, sunshine, and outdoor runs are anything but a given. As if the weather wasn't ominous enough, the political climate has been, well, stormy. But somewhere over the rainbow, there's an explosion of magic and happiness and colors...because (healthy) unicorn food is officially trending.

You've likely seen this very-real cuisine popping up in your Instagram feed, whether it's in the form of a blue algae latte, a slice of (superfood-accented) toast, or tall glass of inflammation-fighting plant-based milk.

The genesis of this latest wellness obsession is anything but mythical. Photographer and stylist Adeline Waugh (better known as Vibrant & Pure) was one of the first to experiment with making healthy, plant-based unicorn food, posting pastel-coated toast on her website and Instagram. "The thing I love about it is how organically it came to be," she says. "I never set out to create a trend."

unicorn food

Unicorns of yore may have noshed on sugar and Lucky Charms, but Waugh made over their diet with cream cheese dyed with hot beet juice (for pink), turmeric (yellow), chlorophyll drops (green), spirulina powder (light blue), freeze dried blueberry powder (purple), and a power duo of beet juice and freeze dried strawberry for light pink.

Waugh explains that she was playing around in her kitchen trying to figure out how to make hot pink cream cheese—as you do—and she just blended them together so they looked like paint-brush strokes.

[For the full story, head to Well + Good]

More from Well + Good:
Why Instagramming Your Smoothie Bowl May Make it Taste Better
How to Treat Eating as an Act of Self-Love
4 Foods That You Think are Healthy—But Nutritionists Don't

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