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Up Your Veg Game This November with the Freshest Fruits and Vegetables

November Produce Picks

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Say thanks for all the goodness November has to offer! As the cold weather settles in and the holiday season approaches, the heartier produce starts to appear—perfect for warming soups, stews, casseroles, and other feel-good recipes. (Find inspiration with these 15 Savory Slow Cooker Recipes.)

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Yukon Gold Potatoes

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These slightly butter-flavored spuds cook up very tender and hold up well. The skin can get tough, so it’s best to peel before using. And potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin C—with the impending flu season, you want to take in as much as possible! They’re also a good source of potassium and vitamin B6. (These 11 Cranberry Recipes Will Warm You Up on Cold Days.)

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Kale

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This member of the cabbage family has been shown to help prevent cancer. One cup of chopped kale has about 30 calories, 2 grams of protein, and close to 7 times the recommended daily amount of vitamin K. It also contains over twice the recommended daily amount of vitamin A and 134 percent of vitamin C, plus the phytochemical lutein, which has been associated with eye health. To maintain the vitamin C, tear for a fresh salad right before serving.

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Cranberries

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These scarlet berries are in season October through December—so get them while you can! One cup of cranberries contains 46 calories, 5 grams of fiber, and 22 percent of the daily recommended dose of vitamin C. They're also brimming with anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins, which may help fight certain types of cancer including breast, lung, and colon.

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Parsnips

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In the 1600s, Europeans brought this “white carrot” to the US. Because the first frost converts its starch to sugar, giving it a nutty sweet flavor, parsnips became known as a winter veggie. (We had top chefs share Healthy Recipes to Add Parsnips to Your Dinner Menu.)

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Golden Beets

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You may be familiar with the purple colored beets, but these babies come in a golden color too. Select small to medium beets that are firm with a smooth skin and no soft spots. Ideally, the stems should be attached—the beet greens are edible too! Store in a re-sealable bag in the back of the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

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Navel Oranges

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These oranges get their name from the small, navel-like formation on their blossom end. They're sweet and juicy with a pleasant floral aroma, and one medium navel orange has 80 calories, 3 grams of fiber, 14 grams of sugar, and provide 120 percent of your daily recommended amount of the antioxidant vitamin C. They also provide 10 percent of the B vitamins thiamin and folate.

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Rosemary

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This member of the mint family is a symbol of fidelity and love. The leaves are needle-shaped and very fragrant with hints of lemon and pine. One tablespoon has only 2 calories, but it also provides a bunch of nutrients like vitamin A, iron, and manganese. It also provides polyphenols, shown to have antioxidant properties.

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Radishes

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This member of the mustard family can range in color from white to purple to red to black, come in all types of round shapes, and have a mild to peppery taste. Radishes have 20 calories per cup and are another rich source of vitamin C, providing 25 percent of the recommended daily amount per serving. They also provide important nutrients like potassium, folate, and calcium. Soak 'em for 20 minutes to 2 hours to increase their crispiness. (That's why they're one of the 50 Tastiest Foods Under 50 Calories.) 

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Kambocha Squash

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This round squash usually has a green exterior (some varieties are bright orange instead) and bright orange-yellow flesh. It has a nutty, earthy flavor with a touch of sweetness—it’s like a cross between pumpkin and sweet potato. When shopping, choose kambocha squash that are firm and heavy for their size. The outside should be dull without any soft spots—but don't worry, the light-colored bumps on the outside are normal. 

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Celery Root

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Also called celeriac, this veggie tastes like a cross between celery and parsley. Its flesh is a creamy white color, while the skin has a brownish color. Celery root can range in size from an orange to a small cantaloupe. Make sure to choose celery root that's small and firm to the touch with minimal knobs and roots. Avoid those with signs of spoilage and soft spots. You can store it in the refrigerator in a plastic bag for up to seven days.

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