You are here

What We Can Learn From Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution

Last night the premiere of the second season of Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution aired on ABC. The reality TV show chronicles chef Jamie Oliver's attempts at making over school cafeterias to serve healthier — and many times tastier — fare to students. With some British charm, Jamie also shows school administrators how to make healthy meals at an affordable cost — because at one point or another they all seem to fight for tator tots and chocolate milk to stay on the lunch menu due to lack of school funding.

For anyone who's seen the show and wishes that our children had healthier options in our public schools, last night's episode in Los Angeles was particularly frustrating, as Oliver kept facing road block after road block. While only time will tell how and if that situation works out, there are a few lessons to be learned from last night's show. All of them are generally good life lessons, but they also come in handy if you're trying to make a change for the healthier in your community.

3 Things to Learn from Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution

1. Persistence pays offs. If Jamie Oliver quit after hearing his first "no," there would be no show and there would be no revolution. There is so much misunderstanding when it comes to nutrition and funding (you really can make cheap and healthy meals — you just have to use really affordable ingredients and in-season produce) that it takes time and a whole lot of patience to truly convince people that change can happen and should happen.

2. Take the politics out. Do you remember the Food Revolution scene from season 1 where Jamie went on a radio talk show only to be told that he didn't need to be telling others what to eat? Food is a touchy subject, and school funding is a highly political subject. When it comes to getting our schools healthier, it shouldn't be about the politics — it should be about the kids.

3. It takes a village. You say you want a revolution? To help Jamie Oliver's cause and improve the quality of food in your local schools, sign the Food Revolution petition. After all, no woman is an island!

Jennipher WaltersJennipher Walters is the CEO and co-founder of the healthy living websites FitBottomedGirls.com and FitBottomedMamas.com. A certified personal trainer, lifestyle and weight management coach and group exercise instructor, she also holds an MA in health journalism and regularly writes about all things fitness and wellness for various online publications.

Comments

Add a comment