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Edible Cosmetics Redefine Inner Beauty

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Edible Cosmetics Redefine Inner Beauty

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Edible Cosmetics Redefine Inner Beauty
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Beauty lotions and potions are so 2011. The newest way to make your skin glow, clear up acne, and brighten your eyes isn't with a little bottle of face cream but rather chocolate creme—as in the case of Borba's slimming chews and Frutel's new acne fighter both made out of, yes, chocolate. Apparently eating it doesn't make you break out or gain weight! That is, if you buy into it.

While women have long ingested pills and vitamins in order to grow healthier hair, stronger nails, and glowing skin, this next generation of edible cosmetics sees your puny Flinstone vitamin and raises you with a range of delicious products that include vitamins, herbs, fruit extracts, and a host of other good-for-you compounds. But why should we eat our makeup when we could get the same vitamins in their natural form by eating whole, healthy foods?

Tanya Zuckerbrot, the official dietitian of the Miss America pageant and co-creator of the edible Beauty Booster, says succinctly, "Juices have a ton of calories. Who wants to sacrifice their behind for their face?" Did we mention the Beauty Booster is calorie- and sugar-free?

Long popular in Europe and Japan, the new industry is just catching on in America, thanks in no small part to celebrities seen carrying the products and their almost-as-famous doctors. Designer Norma Kamali even has her own line of specialty olive oils said to be based on her Spanish-Lebanese upbringing saying, "Olive oil was part of our lives and not just on the table. My mother knew it was good for so many things, so I was indoctrinated quite early."

Designer olive oil is one thing, but gummy bears that give you "gorgeous skin and anti-aging power?" Edible cosmetics are available in a variety of forms, including candy chews, gummies, drinks, and concentrates that range in potency. But the real question is do they work? Doctors and nutritionists are, naturally, dubious.

"Good skin does not come from slickly marketed beauty drinks and foods, but from vegetables, whole foods, and plain water," critics say. The FDA is staying out of it, as they don't regulate cosmetics.

It might be a while before all the research gets sorted out. In the meantime if you're going to eat a granola bar, would it hurt to try one that also "improves skin tone" like the Nimble Bar?

What do you think of this new category of "neutriceuticals"? Would try edible makeup? Leave a comment and tell us your thoughts!

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