You are here

The Best Standing Desks for Work, Approved By Shape Editors

ErgotronHome Lift35

1 of 6

All photos

Tester: Lauren Mazzo, Shape.com Editorial Assistant

Pros: This standing desk slides up and down super easily—meaning I can sit and stand as often as I'd like. Plus, the multi-level large surface area means I have room for a laptop, external monitor, keyword, mouse, and my coffee. Bonus: it comes in six different colors, so you can make sure it matches your office or home decor.

Cons: It takes up a decent amount of room on my desk, making it feel a bit cluttered. If your cube is tiny, it might overwhelm the area. 

($450; ergotronhome.com)

Humanscale QuickStand

2 of 6

All photos

Tester: Rachael Schultz, Shape.com News Editor

Pros: The mount is easy to move up and down and isn’t a bulky eyesore sitting on the desk. The platform that moves is big enough to hold your keyboard, notebooks, and coffee. Plus, the company is partnering with Tome Software in creating OfficeIQ, an app that syncs with sensors on your chair and desk to nudge you when you’ve been sitting too long. It even syncs with your wearable device to include the calories you’ve burned from standing during the day!

Cons: It’s clean, it moves smoothly, and it’s stable enough to lean on. I really can’t think of any cons, other than the price tag.

($830; humanscale.com

ProForm ThinLine Desk Treadmill

3 of 6

All photos

Tester: Ashley Mateo, Shape.com Deputy Editor

Pros: You're standing and moving, meaning (once you get used to the idea of typing and walking) you're burning calories without even thinking about it. You can also adjust your speed, incline, and desk height until it's the perfect fit for your body and your fitness level. Bonus: the desk folds up so you can use this as an actual treadmill too.

Cons: It's big, so the chances of it fitting in to your cubicle are slim to none (it's best for home offices or the corner office). And if you use your office's common space, you're going to get all looks all day long. The sound is a little distracting for coworkers who aren't into background noise, and if you get distracted, be careful—you can fall!

($1,999; proform.com)

Varidesk Pro Plus

4 of 6

All photos

Tester: Cassie Shortsleeve, Shape.com Editor-at-Large

Pros: It's super easy to set up (seriously—took me five minutes!); mobile; comes with a great little mat to stand on to keep your feet comfortable; and has multiple levels for extra monitors, screens, or keyboards. It's also easy to adjust up and down and works great both ways, so you can comfortably take breaks sitting. Compared to other products I've used, it's fairly affordable.

Cons: It's heavy (I love that you can move  it,  because some stand-up desks are difficult to relocate and require that you connect the computer to it, but this is not the easiest piece of equipment to move!). I really love everything else about it!

($350; varidesk.com

Ergotron Sit-Stand Workstation

5 of 6

All photos

Tester: Kylie Gilbert, Shape.com Assistant Editor

Pros: The transition from sitting to standing is seamless and it doesn't take up too much desk space. Plus, it's relatively affordable compared to other options on the market! 

Cons: Unless you buy a separate add-on, there's no place to put papers or coffee, so there's lots of reaching down involved. It's also a hard adjustment if you're used to using two screens.

(Prices vary between $300-$400; ergotron.com)

Clear Nesting Tables

6 of 6

All photos

Tester: Isabel Burton, Shape Executive Editor

Pros: Not only are clear nesting tables like these an affordable and aesthetically pleasing alternative to a traditional standing desk, they're also extremely versatile and can be used down the road as a side table in your bedroom or living room! 

Cons: Unlike most traditional standing desks, you can't adjust the height, so it's important to measure before ordering to ensure you won't strain your neck while using.

($150; allmodern.com)

Comments

Add a comment