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Breast Cancer Treatment

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Breast Cancer Treatment

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Breast Cancer Treatment
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Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)

An approach is generally called complementary medicine when it is used along with standard treatment and alternative when it is used instead of standard treatment. Before deciding to use CAM, it's important to understand possible side effects and risks.

Types of CAM include acupuncture, massage therapy, herbal products, vitamins or special diets, visualization, meditation, and spiritual healing. Although CAM helps many women feel better, some methods may change the way standard treatment works. So it's always important to weight the benefits against the risks before embarking on any treatment. Also to bear in mind: Health insurance may not cover the cost of various forms of CAM.

Nutrition and physical activity

It is important for women with breast cancer to take care of themselves. Taking care of yourself includes eating well and staying as active as you can.

You need the right amount of calories to maintain a good weight. You also need enough protein to keep up your strength. Eating well may help you feel better and have more energy.

Sometimes, especially during or soon after treatment, you may not feel like eating. You may be uncomfortable or tired. You may find that foods do not taste as good as they used to. In addition, the side effects of treatment (such as poor appetite, nausea, vomiting, or mouth sores) can make it difficult to eat well. Your doctor, dietitian, or other health care provider can suggest ways to deal with these problems.

Many women find they feel better when they stay active. Walking, yoga, swimming, and other activities can keep you strong and increase your energy. Exercise may reduce nausea and pain and make treatment easier to handle. It also can help relieve stress. Whatever physical activity you choose, be sure to talk to your doctor before you start. Also, if your activity causes you pain or other problems, be sure to let your doctor or nurse know.

Follow-up care

Follow-up care after treatment for breast cancer is important. Recovery is different for each woman. Your recovery depends on your treatment, whether the disease has spread, and other factors.

Even when the cancer seems to have been completely removed or destroyed, the disease sometimes returns because undetected cancer cells remained somewhere in the body after treatment. That's why it's important for your doctor to monitor your recovery and check for recurrence.

Report any changes in the treated area or in your other breast to the doctor right away. Tell your doctor about any health problems, such as pain, loss of appetite or weight, changes in menstrual cycles, unusual vaginal bleeding, or blurred vision. Also talk to your doctor about headaches, dizziness, shortness of breath, coughing or hoarseness, backaches, or digestive problems that seem unusual or that don't go away. Such problems may arise months or years after treatment. They may suggest that the cancer has returned, but they can also be symptoms of other health problems.

Follow-up exams usually include the breasts, chest, neck, and underarm areas. Since you are at risk of getting cancer again, you should have mammograms of your preserved breast and your other breast. You probably will not need a mammogram of a reconstructed breast or if you had a mastectomy without reconstruction. Your doctor may order other imaging procedures or lab tests.

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