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6 Orgasm Disorders You've Never Heard Of

6 Orgasm Disorders You've Never Heard Of

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In most instances, orgasms are kind of like pizza: Even when they’re bad, they’re pretty darn good. But we now know that’s not always the case. For some women, the big O can be pretty darn complicated—maybe they’re not having them, or they’re having too many, or having them sets off some not-so-great reactions like pain or sneezes (we’ll get to that). Yes, the six climax-related conditions ahead actually exist.

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The Orgasmic Headache

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Officially known as headaches with sexual activity or coital cephalgia, these occur just before or during an orgasm, and can either feel like your head is in a vice or like a sudden explosion of pain (fun!). The condition often goes away without treatment, but you should see your doctor since it can be a sign of a serious problem, like low blood pressure. Your doc be able to offer help: For some women, taking NSAIDs about 30 minutes before they get busy helps prevent the pain, Lauren Streicher, M.D., author of Sex RX notes. (Worth noting: Having sex can also cure headaches, research shows.) 

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The Non-Vaginal Orgasms

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There’s at least one case of “Foot Orgasm Syndrome” in the books, and experts are looking for more cases. It’s pretty much exactly what it sounds like: One poor soul reported feeling spontaneous orgasms in her left foot. Her doctors believed there were some crossed wires in her nervous system (the nerves for the foot and the nerves for your genitals enter the spinal cord at a very similar point) and cured her by injecting her with anesthesia.

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Painful Orgasms

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This usually goes hand in hand with painful sex, and is another condition that should be checked out by an ob-gyn, says Streicher. It could be caused by an infection, an injury, or another pelvic issue like endometriosis. Another possibility: Some women (who’ve already read our guide to achieving multiple Os) find that after having one orgasm, their subsequent climaxes start to hurt. In that case, says Streicher, give it a rest for a while; things should get back to normal after a day or so.

Photo: Corbis Images

Non-Stop Orgasms

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Constant orgasms might sound good, but women who’ve had the condition, known as Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder, say it’s pretty much hell. The slightest clitoral pressure—from wearing tight jeans, riding in a car, or just sitting—can set off hours or even days of non-stop arousal and orgasms, that can sometimes become painful. Doctors aren’t sure what causes the condition, but an ob-gyn can conduct an exam to see if there are physical culprits (like nerve entrapment) and put together a treatment plan. (A more common problem: low libido. These six sex drive-boosters can help.) 

Photo: Corbis Images

Sneeze-gasms

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Sexually-induced sneezes are a thing. They occur when someone sneezes whenever they’re turned on, having sex, or climaxing. (Those germs still travel 200 times further than you’d think.) Scientists think it happens when some wires in your autonomic nervous system, which regulates arousal, get crossed; it’s also possible that people with this problem have some erectile tissue in their nasal passages (!). The solution: Take a decongestant before sex. But taking them too often can be unhealthy, so check with your M.D. first.

Photo: Corbis Images

No Orgasms

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This may well be the most common condition of the bunch, says Streicher. Up to 15 percent of women have never had an orgasm—like these three women—and as many as 40 percent have had problems with orgasm at some point in their life. There are tons of factors that can make the big O elusive, from mental issues (you’re not into the relationship anymore, you’re super-stressed at work, there is abuse in your past) to physical ones (you’re on drugs—prescribed or not—that suppress desire, you have a medical condition, etc.). Bottom line: If you haven’t seen a doctor yet, do. There are nearly as many treatments as there are culprits, and you owe it to yourself to explore them.

Photo: Corbis Images

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