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The Easiest Fix for Low Sex Drive You’ve Ever Heard

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Forget feeling well rested—there’s an even better reason to score more sleep: Women who logged more hours of rest had a stronger sex drive, higher likelihood of actually getting some, and experienced more satisfying sex the next day, reports a new study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. (So easy! Check out these other 8 Surprising Things Affecting Your Sex Life.)

Specifically, every additional hour of sleep increased their likelihood of lovemaking by 14 percent. Not only were the chances higher, but researchers found sleep was crucial for genital arousal. In fact, women who slept longer experienced fewer problems with physical excitement than women who skimped on the shuteye.

Researcher’s aren’t entirely sure why, but past studies from the same team have shown that women are more likely to be in the mood if they are already happy, jovial, and anxiety-free—moods that are all more likely after a good night’s sleep.

Plus, chronic sleep deprivation—which can occur even if you log just under the recommended seven hours a night—can lower levels of testosterone (the sex drive hormone) in both men and women, said Robert D. Oexman, director of the Sleep to Live Institute in Joplin, MO.

So if every hour of zzz's ups your sex drive, should you just stay in bed all day? Not quite. People who consistently clock more than nine or 10 hours a night face a number of health problems, said Michael A. Grandner, Ph.D., an instructor of psychiatry and a member of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine program at the University of Pennsylvania. (Check out these 12 Common Sleep Myths, Busted.)

In addition to your desire to get down, hitting the hay early or snoozing in the a.m. can help you stave off cravings, eat healthier, and even lose weight. And if you don’t make it to bed until late, turn to the second place winner: naps. Just two 30-minute naps could reverse the negative effects of an extremely sleep-deprived night, including that sink in your sex drive, according to a new study published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (Learn The Art of Taking a Good Nap.)

Scoring enough sleep and still not feeling frisky? Uncover the culprit behind Low Libido in Women: What's Killing Your Sex Drive?

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