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Female Ejaculation: Myth or Reality?

Female ejaculation and squirting—same thing, right? Actually, wrong.  

The latest research found that squirting is actually a gush of fluid coming out of the eurethra and is, in fact, urine. Meanwhile, female ejaculation is the release of a thicker, milky-er, white substance that is actually super similar to semen, just without the sperm, according to Shape sexpert Dr. Logan Levkoff. In fact, this substance is even made of prostatic acid, glucose, and fructose, just like semen.

Female ejaculation and “squirting” were already pretty divisive issues in the sexual health world. But now that we know they're not even the same thing? Mind = blown. 

In a previous study, researchers had women pee, then stimulated them until they ejaculated. Pelvic ultrasound scans showed that women’s bladders were at least partially full before they squirted, but empty after—indicating that the liquid originated from the bladder. Sure enough, when the researchers tested the liquid, two out of seven of the samples were chemically identical to urine. (Check out four other Sex Rumors to Stop Believing.) 

The other five samples also had something called prostatic-specific antigen (PSA), an enzyme that’s produced by the Skene glands, which are often referred to as the female prostate. These glands are located inside the vagina at the lower end of the urethra, and is where scientists believe female ejaculate comes from, according to Dr. Levkoff. 

So the first group indeed "squirted," while the second group had ejaculated. What does all this mean for your sex life? Nothing—however your body responds to orgasm, own it, says Dr. Levkoff. 

The jury’s still out on whether you can teach yourself how to squirt, but if you’re one of the 10 to 54 percent of women who already do, there’s no need to feel self-conscious about it, says Leah Millheiser, M.D., director of the Female Sexual Medicine Program at Stanford University Medical Center. “I tell women who experience female ejaculation and feel nervous or embarrassed about it to just tell new partners up front before sex: Hey, this is something that happens to me. It’s a sign that the sex is really good!” says Millheiser. Then just lay down a towel or plastic sheets and get to business. (Don’t forget: You’re not the only one who can get shy in bed. Here’s How to Deal with His Most Embarrassing Sexual Issues.) 

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