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Have an Amazing Orgasm: Eat Right for a Bigger O!

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There’s a reason why romantic dates often involve wining and dining, says dietician Torey Jones Armul: “Eating causes the release of oxytocin, which is associated with feelings of pleasure. The act of eating, like a massage, is intended to feel good.”

But what you eat can amplify that pleasurable effect—and we’re not talking chocolate and champagne. Two brain chemicals, dopamine and serotonin, are strongly linked to pleasure, satisfaction, and mood. (They're also both on the list of the 20 Most Important Hormones for Your Health.) In fact, low dopamine levels can lead to a low sex drive. Fortunately, proteins found in beans, nuts, and poultry, as well as the amino acid tyrosine, found in bananas, avocados, and almonds, all help your body maintain it’s dopamine levels, says Armul. And eating folate- and B-vitamin-rich food like leafy greens, chickpeas, fish, and fruits and vegetables, can keep your levels of feel-good serotonin high too.

As for traditional aphrodisiacs like chocolates and oysters? There’s not much scientific support to back them up, says Armul. However, studies have linked both moderate red wine consumption and an apple-a-day habit to improved sexual function. And while they haven't necessarily been linked directly to orgasm, antioxidant-rich foods like beets, cherries, and oranges can improve vasodilation (the opening of veins for blood flow)—which could improve arousal, and in turn, strengthen your orgasm.

And, of course, eating well and taking care of your body can help you feel comfortable in your own skin—which can mean lowered inhibitions (and more pleasure) in the bedroom. “Valuing your body and what it can do for you, rather than it’s appearance, leads to self acceptance,” says Armul. “And that leads to sexual confidence and satisfaction.”

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