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Take a Hike

You don't need to go hard-core rugged to net the many benefits of hiking. "Think of hiking as simply taking a longer walk in nature; you can hike at any pace, at any elevation, and for any number of miles, hours, or even days," says Alyson Chun, a senior instructor for the REI Outdoor School, which offers classes and getaways focused on the great outdoors. No matter how tricky (or easy) your trail, every hike has its perks. First, even a moderate one-hour hike can burn around 400 calories, all while sculpting your core and lower body. And as the elevation goes up, so do the benefits. "The more challenging the hike, the more calories—and stress—you'll melt away," Chun says.

Major bonus: It doesn't take a lot to get started. Unlike other outdoor sports that are gear heavy and often require travel and lessons, such as rock climbing and waterskiing, the barrier to entry-level hiking is low. "You really need only two key items: proper footwear and a day bag, " Chun says. Find a trail near you at Hiking Project, which features GPS and elevation data and user-generated tips for almost 14,000 beginner to advanced trails. (Just remember to download your route from the app to have it on hand for when you lose cell reception, as often happens in the wilderness.)

And if you already do quick jaunts on your neighborhood trails, maybe it's time you experienced the next level of this natural high on a daylong trek. "Long-distance hikes open up a whole new world of terrain and boost your sense of accomplishment," Chun says. Plus, fall is the perfect season to get going: fewer bugs! Gorgeous weather! Pretty leaves! Grab a granola bar (and all other hiking essentials) and set out to tap these powerful rewards. (And once you're hooked, you can add hiking these picturesque National Parks to your fitness bucket list.)


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These Benefits of Hiking Will Make You Want to Hit the Trails

Take a Hike

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You don't need to go hard-core rugged to net the many benefits of hiking. "Think of hiking as simply taking a longer walk in nature; you can hike at any pace, at any elevation, and for any number of miles, hours, or even days," says Alyson Chun, a senior instructor for the REI Outdoor School, which offers classes and getaways focused on the great outdoors. No matter how tricky (or easy) your trail, every hike has its perks. First, even a moderate one-hour hike can burn around 400 calories, all while sculpting your core and lower body. And as the elevation goes up, so do the benefits. "The more challenging the hike, the more calories—and stress—you'll melt away," Chun says.

Major bonus: It doesn't take a lot to get started. Unlike other outdoor sports that are gear heavy and often require travel and lessons, such as rock climbing and waterskiing, the barrier to entry-level hiking is low. "You really need only two key items: proper footwear and a day bag, " Chun says. Find a trail near you at Hiking Project, which features GPS and elevation data and user-generated tips for almost 14,000 beginner to advanced trails. (Just remember to download your route from the app to have it on hand for when you lose cell reception, as often happens in the wilderness.)

And if you already do quick jaunts on your neighborhood trails, maybe it's time you experienced the next level of this natural high on a daylong trek. "Long-distance hikes open up a whole new world of terrain and boost your sense of accomplishment," Chun says. Plus, fall is the perfect season to get going: fewer bugs! Gorgeous weather! Pretty leaves! Grab a granola bar (and all other hiking essentials) and set out to tap these powerful rewards. (And once you're hooked, you can add hiking these picturesque National Parks to your fitness bucket list.)


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Your Legs Will Never Look Better

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Most hikes involve climbing up a big hill or even a mountain, then coming back down, a combo that's a great workout for your legs. "Trekking up a mountain is a lot like climbing the stairclimber or doing lunges over and over, which strengthens your glutes, quads, hamstrings, and calves," says Joel Martin, Ph.D., an assistant professor of exercise, fitness, and health promotion at George Mason University.

But traveling downhill is what really leaves your legs sore, then sculpted. "To go downhill, your glutes and quads need to do a lot of slow, controlled work to stabilize your knees and hips so you don't fall," Martin says. "These types of contractions [called eccentric contractions; the same kind your muscles experience when you slowly lower a weight at the gym] damage muscle fibers the most because you're resisting the force of gravity against weight, which in this case is the weight of your body." This means that while you probably won't huff and puff on the descent, your muscles aren't getting a second to slack. (Don't believe us? These hiking celebs are proof that it gets you fit and refreshed.)

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Every Step Firms Your Core

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Navigating tough terrain also requires your abs, obliques, and lower back to work to keep your body stabilized and upright—even more so if you're carrying a backpack. "A heavier bag—around eight to 10 pounds—makes you more unstable, so your core muscles need to work harder," Martin says. You'll burn calories regardless (anywhere from 400 to 800 an hour, depending on the trail, he says), but your hiking bag can help you hit the high end of that range. (Want a hike-free way to get a shredded core? Try10 crunch-free moves for killer abs.)

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It's Killer Cross-Training

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Whether you're prepping for a race or you just want to round out your spinning routine, scheduling some hikes can improve your fitness level in ways that up your running and cycling game. "Cyclists tend to have strong quads but underdeveloped hamstrings, and runners tend to have weak hamstrings and glutes," Martin says. "Hiking helps strengthen these muscles to eliminate those types of imbalances."

Plus, if you hike regularly at high altitudes (4,000 feet and up), you'll get used to exercising in a low-oxygen environment, he says, so your body will adapt to using less oxygen, which could lead to improved performance the next time you do a race. When 18 male endurance runners did high-intensity aerobic training in a low-oxygen state (9,842 feet above sea level) twice a week for six weeks, they increased the time it took for them to fatigue by 35 percent, while those who trained at sea level had an increase of just 10 percent, a study in the Journal of Applied Physiology found. One catch: "A single hike won't have much of an effect; consistency is key," Martin says. Start a hike habit and you might hit that PR. (Double up on your outdoor cross-training by getting your om on outside.)

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It Gets You Moving Better Around the Clock

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A lot of standard exercise—running, walking, lunging, squatting—moves you forward and backward or up and down. Hiking, on the other hand, forces you to move every which way, as you climb over fallen trees and sidestep slippery rocks. "By doing things that require you to move in multiple directions, you strengthen the stabilizing muscles that fire to prevent common injuries," Martin says. Think about it: Most everyday injuries occur when people quickly shift from one plane of motion to another, such as when they reach over to pick up a heavy object and pull a back muscle. If you're not used to moving this way, other muscles will try to compensate for weak stabilizers, resulting in poor form and potentially a pull, a pop, a tear, or a break. (Did you know these 5 exercises are the biggest culprits for workout injuries?)

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It's a Happy Pill

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Know that mmm...ah! feeling you get when you see a beautiful waterfall or gaze out from atop a mountain? Research shows that such experiences benefit your state of mind: People who spent 50 minutes walking through nature reported less anxiety and more happiness compared with those who walked near traffic, according to a study in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning. "We know that just looking at photos of nature reduces stress," says Susan Krauss Whitbourne, Ph.D., a professor of psychology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. (See every default desktop background ever.)

Even five minutes in nature can boost your mood and self-esteem, according to a review of studies by the University of Essex in England. And because exercise produces endorphins (known as the happiness hormone), actually moving through nature takes the feel-good benefits to a new level. "Hiking creates a wonderful combination of less stress and more happiness," Whitbourne says. (Bring these snacks along to boost your mood even more!)

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It Sure Beats Bonding at the Bar

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Working toward a unified goal—like making your way through the woods with others—strengthens relationships and builds bonds."Hiking usually involves solving little problems together ['Uh, did we make a wrong turn?'], which makes you feel more accomplished as a group," says Dustin Portzline, an American Mountain Guide Association–certified rock guide."I always remember the people I hiked with more than anything else." No hiking buddy? No problem. Check for a hiking group in your area at Meetup or sign up for an outing with the REI Outdoor School to go with a pro and plenty of company. (Love working out with someone else? Try this bring-a-friend workout.)

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Tom Saab Goong with Spiralized Zucchini

Noodle bowls have been getting a lot of love lately, but instead of ordering takeout Thai broth-drenched noodles, make a more waist-friendly version at home. This recipe uses zucchini noodles to lighten it up, but the shrimp will keep you full!

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Plantain Noodles with Avocado, Corn, and Chipotle Greek Yogurt

If you've ever ordered up a side of fried plantains at a Mexican restaurant, you know they're delicious—but they can also be dripping with grease. This Mexican meal is made healthier with good-for-you fats from avocado and clean carbs from corn and sweet plantain.

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Turnip Risotto with Crispy Pancetta and Chives

Traditional risottos take a long time and a lot of attention to make, plus they're heavy on the carbs. This version turns turnips—yes, turnips—into a rice substitute that tastes shockingly similar to the arborio version used in the classic recipe! Just like white rice, the turnip fluffs up and absorbs the liquid when you cook it.

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Photo: Evan Sung