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The Top 10 Inspiring Moments from the 2016 CrossFit Games

When Katrín Tanja Davíðsdóttir was named the Fittest Woman on Earth—again

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From her reaction in this pic, you might think that it was Katrin's first time winning the "Fittest Woman on Earth" title. Her caption, "2016 FITTEST ON EARTH - IS THIS REAL LIFE?!" might suggest the same. But the 2016 CrossFit Games mark the second year that this Icelandic athlete is taking home the top spot. (Want to give CrossFit a try? Here's what to expect from your first workout.)

Photo: @katrintanja Instagram

When Kara Webb won the "Spirit of the Games" Award

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Each year at the CrossFit Games, one athlete receives the "Spirit of the Games" award, which goes to a Games athlete who embodies the unique spirit of the CrossFit community. This year, it went to Kara Webb who was disappointed not to finish in the top spot, as she hoped, but said in this Instagram caption that the "Spirit of the Games is the most amazing thing I have ever received." (Watch her priceless reaction to getting the award, as well as a highlight reel from her performance at the 2016 CrossFit Games.)

Photo: @karawebb1 Instagram

When Jennifer Smith continued to compete, despite a tough injury

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American athlete Jen Smith announced just two days into the competition that she was suffering from a partial plantar tear—aka terrible plantar faciitis. She said she tore it during the first event, a trail run. Instead of tapping out, she pushed through the Games, making the necessary modifications, finishing 36th overall (not bad for being seriously injured). (BTW you aren't going to get injured just because you try it. That's just one of the 12 Myths About CrossFit You Shouldn't Believe.)

Photo: @jensmith008 Instagram

When they made rope climbing look way easy

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Christy Phillips Adkins (who finished 24th overall) went back at the rope climb with a special vengeance. In this Instagram, she admitted: "I fell off the rope at the final event of the 2010 @crossfitgames and struggled a ton... It took me two years but I finally got good enough at rope climbs to consider them a STRENGTH rather than a weakness."

Photo: @christycrossfit Instagram

When they threw heavy weight around while looking cool AF

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What's cooler than squat cleaning 215 pounds? Doing it with shades on, like Alea Helmick. Serious strength goals right here. (Throw these ones on for your next workout—they're stylish and good at protecting your eyes from the sun.)

Photo: @aleahelmick Instagram

When they show off on the rings

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Think handstand push-ups are hard? Try them on rings, a lá CrossFit Games 2016 workout "The Separator." Here's, Camille Leblanc-Bazinet (who finished 21st among women) crushing them in the second-to-last day of competition. (She's just one of the crazy strong CrossFitters you need to follow on IG.)

Photo: @crossfitgames Instagram

When they engage in an epic battle for 1st place event finishes

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Australia's Tia-Clair Toomey (2nd at the 2015 and 2016 Games) and Iceland's Katrin Tnaja Davidsdottir (who took 1st both years) battled it out during the Handstand Walk, Suicide Sprint, and the Plow on Saturday. According to this Crossfit Games Instagram post, Davidsdottir began the day in second, rose to first after Handstand Walk, then fell to second after the Suicide Sprint and recaptured the overall lead by winning The Plow. In the end, only 11 points separated the two athletes.

Photo: @crossfitgames Instagram

When they crushed the final day with American Ninja Warrior-level stuff

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Think American Ninja Warrior skills are reserved for the people you see on TV? These peg board ascents—part of the final CrossFit Games workout called "Redemption"—show that these ladies are just as skilled, if not more. Watch the full video to see the serious strength these ladies have.

Photo: @cleverhandz Instagram

When they made average sled-pushes look wimpy

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Like sled-pushes on steroids, this "Snail Push" requires athletes to push a giant drum filled with sandbags 40 feet across the field (a new event at this year's Games). Here, athlete Carly Fuhrer pushes through to take 33rd in the event.

Photo: @crossfitgames Instagram

When they made it a team affair

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While our personal favorite will always be the individual women's competition (because #girlpower), it's pretty inspiring to watch the CrossFit teams go at it as well. If there's one way to sand sprint to/from a 500m ocean swim, it's holding hands with your teammates.

Photo: @reebok Instagram

Sculpt Your Legs and Abs In 4 Minutes Flat

The magic of these moves, courtesy of Instagram fit-lebrity Kaisa Keranen (a.k.a. @KaisaFit), is that they'll torch your core and legs, and recruit the rest of your body too. In just four minutes, you'll get a workout that leaves you feeling like you just came off an hour-long gym sesh. The key? Go all out with effort, so you can feel—and see—the results.

Should You Drink Golden Milk Lattes?

You've likely seen gorgeous steaming yellow mugs on menus, food blogs, and social media (#goldenmilk has nearly 17,000 posts on Instagram alone). The warm drink, called a golden milk latte, mixes the healthy root turmeric with other spices and plant milks. It's no surprise the trend has taken off: "Turmeric has become really popular, and Indian flavors seem to be trending as well," says nutritionist Torey Armul, R.D.N., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

What People Don't Know About Staying Fit In a Wheelchair

I'm 31 years old, and I've been using a wheelchair since the age of five due to a spinal cord injury that left me paralyzed from the waist down. Growing up overly aware of my lack of control of my lower body and in a family that's battled weight issues, I was concerned about staying fit from a young age. For me, it's always been about so much more than vanity—people in wheelchairs need to maintain a healthy weight in order to stay independent.