"So far so good," she said.

By Faith Brar
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Photo: Michael Stewart / FilmMagic / GettyImages

After quitting smoking in 2017, Bella Hadid turned to the Juul, a brand of e-cigarette that's become a phenomenon among young adults and teens. But now, using the New Year as motivation, the Victoria's Secret model has decided to quit vaping and smoking-in every capacity-once and for all.

"2019 resolution-quit Juuling! So far so good!" she wrote on her Instagram Stories along with a video of her blowing fumes into the air, which we're *hoping* was from before she made the resolution.

With celebs like Hadid, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Katy Perry swearing by the Juul, e-cigarettes have been surging in popularity. But on top of just being celeb-approved, these e-cigarettes are often marketed as being better for you than regular cigarettes simply because they don't have tobacco.

While it's hard to outdo the cigarette in terms of health risks, it's important to remember that e-cigarettes and vapes are still made up of ingredients that are very bad for you. "It's not just harmless water vapor and flavor," Jonathan Philip Winickoff, M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and a specialist in family health and smoking cessation at Massachusetts General Hospital, previously told us in What Is Juul and Is It Bad for You? "Not only is it made with N-nitrosonornicotine, a dangerous Group I carcinogen (and the most carcinogenic substance we know of), you're also inhaling acrylonitrile, which is a highly poisonous compound used in plastics and adhesives and synthetic rubbers."

Not to mention, similar to regular cigarettes, Juul is super addictive. In fact, experts say you could get hooked in just a week because of the amount of nicotine in each pod. "The younger you are, the more quickly you get addicted," Dr. Winickoff said. "It changes your brain to be nicotine-hungry by upping the regulation of receptors in the reward center of the brain, and there's some good evidence that nicotine addiction itself potentiates, or increases, addiction to other substances." Which means it'll be even harder to quit.

So major props to Hadid for finally pulling the plug and going smoke-free. While we're sure it won't be easy, we hope she follows through with her goal.

Comments (1)

Anonymous
January 8, 2019
After reading this article, I have growing concern about the claims within. I am a former cigarette smoker who turned to Juul after watching a news story on CBS Sunday morning in which a representative of the CDC, while cautioning young people, actually endorsed the use of Juul to quit smoking, identifying it as much less harmful than cigarettes. I did a lot of research and it does not have the carcinogens you list in your article! I wonder if the writer did their due diligence to research before writing this. I am attaching the link here https://www.cbsnews.com/news/vaping-clearing-the-air-on-the-benefits-and-risks-of-e-cigarettes/ to the news article on CBS news and hope you can correct the errors you present. It is indeed a much healthier option than smoking cigarettes and absolutely does not contain the carcinogens you listed.