The at-home fitness giant is spinning into a new lane — literally.

By Korin Miller
July 20, 2021
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Peloton gaming
Credit: Peloton

Peloton has been a mainstay in at-home fitness for years, but the brand really solidified its place on the throne during the pandemic boom. And now, the company is growing yet again — this time, into the world of gaming.

Peloton has plans to launch a video game called Lanebreak, which is "an experience that sits at the intersection of gaming and fitness," said David Packles, Peloton's senior director of management, in the company's press release on Monday.

It's all in an effort to keep the experience fresh for users, explains Packles. "Even the most dedicated member of the #BooCrew, #YouGetToCrew, #RobinsWolfPack, or #ThunderSquad need to switch it up sometimes," he said in Peloton's release, referencing hashtags used by fans of some of the brands favorite trainers. "Scenic rides/runs, which transport members to beautiful destinations throughout the world, are a great option for many, but our team has always been fascinated by opportunities beyond video."

Packles shared a similar sentiment in a recent interview with Gizmodo. "Content, specifically our instructor-led content, is the heart of Peloton," he said. "...but the reality is that people want variety."

This "what's next?" mentality, ultimately led to the creation of Lanebreak, explains Packles in the press release. Here's everything you need to know about the future of gaming with Peloton.

What is Peloton's Lanebreak?

Lanebreak is a rhythm-based game designed for the Peloton Bike (Buy It, starting at $1,895, peloton.com) and Bike+ (Buy It, starting at $2,495, peloton.com) that's rooted in music. "Players are challenged to match and sustain their resistance or cadence according to the cues on the tablet to get the highest score possible, which they can then compare with other members," explains Packles in Peloton's press release. (Related: Peloton's New Bike+ Makes It Easier Than Ever to Combine Cardio and Strength Training).

How do you play Peloton's Lanebreak?

You start by choosing from a number of different levels that are based on playlists, workout types, and lengths. Then each level has difficulties that range from beginner to expert, according to Peloton's official release. (Related: The Best Peloton Instructor to Match Your Workout Style).

Lanebreak follows members along a virtual track, displayed on the Peloton bike's screen. Riders can control the cadence by how fast they pedal, and "switch" lanes by turning the resistance knob left or right.

Like most video games, challenges are also a critical component of Lanebreak. In each lane, according to Gizmodo, there are a number of challenges synchronized with the beat of the music, including filling up gauges and breaking obstacles. Those participating can also score points, or "pickups," which a player receives when they stay the course, while "streams" are linked to cadence range. "Breakers," however, task the rider to hit a certain output in a limited time frame.

Packles also told Gizmodo that the company plans to "regularly add levels" to Lanebreak just as the on-demand library of workout classes is expanded regularly.

How much is Peloton's Lanebreak?

It's not clear right now if Lanebreak will be a part of the regular Peloton subscription or if members will need to shell out more cash to add it to their software. However, you will need to have a Bike or Bike+, and a Peloton membership. For a limited time, the first three months of Peloton Digital are available the Peloton App's Summer Pass (Buy It, $13 for three months, peloton.com).

When is Peloton's Lanebreak set to launch?

Currently, the beta version of Lanebreak is only available to about 1,000 Peloton users, but it's still under development, according to Gizmodo. << is this from the press release of gizmodo? The press release didn't share when users would be able to gamify their workouts, but Gizmodo reported that Lanebreak is slated to roll out in early 2022.

"This is a brand new space for Peloton, and we are still early on in our development journey," says Packles. "Through experimentation and testing, we'll continue to add mechanics, tweak gameplay and hone in on visuals."