This egg- and dairy-free banana bread also has 6 grams of fiber per slice—what's not to loaf, err, love?!

By Jessica Cording, MS, RD, CDN
June 02, 2020
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Jessica Cording,

Fact: Banana bread is a delicious way to use up ripe-to-overripe bananas. But, and this is also a fact, not all loaves are created equal. Many traditional recipes leave a lot to be desired in terms of nutrition and dietary restrictions. With a few little tweaks, though, you can create a nutrient-rich, gluten-free banana bread that's packed with flavor.

Swapping out the butter for avocado oil introduces some heart-healthy monounsaturated fats (aka good fats) and using a little honey in place of the usual heap of white sugar allows the natural sweetness of the bananas to shine. As for making this bad boy gluten-free? NBD. If you want a fluffier texture similar to classic banana bread made with white flour, use a 1:1 gluten-free baking mix, such as Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free All Purpose Baking Flour (Buy It, $10, target.com). This flour combines several types of gluten-free flours in a specific ratio to get a similar look and feel as regular white flour. Keep in mind, however, that the fiber content may be a little lower depending on which brand you choose. If you don't mind a slightly denser loaf (which, IMO, tastes more filling) go for an all-purpose gluten-free flour mix with some higher-fiber alternatives such as brown rice and garbanzo bean flours. (See also: 5 Easy Gluten-Free Recipes Made from Chickpea Flour)

The ground flax in this healthy, gluten-free banana bread recipe adds a little extra fiber and plant-based omega-3s, which are known for their anti-inflammatory properties. It also helps bind the ingredients together, which is often difficult to achieve in gluten-free baking as gluten acts like the "glue" that keeps everything together. (If you're wondering what to do with that giant bag of flax you have left over, you can also use it in this oatmeal pancake recipe.)

As if you needed another reason to whip up this gluten-free banana bread, it can easily be made dairy-free as well. Because the recipe calls for 1/4 cup of whatever milk you fancy, you can just sub dairy for plant milk and, violá, you have a dairy-free and gluten-free banana bread. FWIW, I typically use two percent cow's milk or unsweetened pea protein milk since it has a comparable protein content and mild taste and texture (and because I'm allergic to almonds and coconuts), but you do you.

Enjoy a slice of this gluten-free banana bread as a sweet snack or spread your favorite nut butter on top and enjoy it for breakfast.

Gluten-Free Banana Bread

Makes: 12 slices

Cook time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Total time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup avocado oil
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 3 ripe bananas, mashed
  • 1/2 cup honey or maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup milk of choice (ideally unsweetened if you're using plant milk)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 3/4 cups gluten-free all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 2 tbsp ground flax
  • 1/2 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips or 1/2 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease a loaf pan with avocado oil or oil spray or line it with parchment paper.
  2. Mash bananas, beat eggs, and then combine both with oil, honey, milk, and vanilla in a large mixing bowl.
  3. Add flour, baking soda, and flax, and mix until well combined.
  4. Fold in chocolate chips and/or chopped walnuts, if using.
  5. Pour batter into a greased loaf pan, and bake for 1 hour and 20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.
  6. Store gluten-free banana bread in an airtight container; it will keep on the counter for three to four days and in the refrigerator for longer.

Nutrition info per slice*: 238 calories, 11g fat, 1.5g saturated fat, 30g carbs, 12g sugar, 4g protein, 2g fiber

*When made with 2% milk, no chocolate or nuts—exact nutritional information will vary based on the type of flour, milk, and any additions.

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