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5 Edible Flower Recipes That Taste Like Spring

Orange Blossom Cake

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Orange blossom water is an aromatic, elegant flavor enhancer that adds a dreamy scent, whether it’s mixed into cakes and quick breads, whipped into creams and sauces, or shaken into a cocktail. For the biggest punch, look for orange blossom water that has only distilled orange blossoms listed in the ingredients.

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Photo: Marcus Nilsson

Rose and Spice Hummus

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Dried roses, with their delicate aroma, work wonders to balance out spicy dishes or add a perfumy bite to creamy desserts. Buy the edible organic version (to avoid pesticides), grind them, and combine with savory spices. Our favorite combo:

  • 3 tablespoons rose petals, ground fine
  • 2 teaspoons mild yellow curry powder
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon ground ginger

Now try it in soups and puddings and as a rub for grilled or roasted meat. (Or better yet, make a healthy Mediterranean tapas board.)

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Photo: Marcus Nilsson

Herb Blossom Smoked-Salmon Spirals

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The small flower blooms on chives, basil, thyme, and dill make a colorful garnish. But more than that, when used with the herb, they intensify the taste, showcasing every part of the plant’s personality. Buy them from the farmers market, or snip them right off the plant if you have an herb garden. These buds are especially tasty and beautiful on top of smoked fish, ceviche, and spreads.

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Photo: Marcus Nilsson

Lavender Honey-Roasted Mixed Nuts

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Lavender’s subtle notes are a nice counterbalance to both rich and sweet elements in savory dishes as well as dessert. One of the best ways to enjoy it is in a salt: Combine 1 tablespoon dried edible lavender buds and 1 teaspoon kosher salt on a cutting board, and coarsely chop. Use it to season nuts, chicken, or fish after grilling; shortbread or scones prebaking; and truffles or chocolate bark before they set. (Also try this purple cauliflower cashew soup or iced matcha green tea latte with your extra lavender.)

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Photo: Marcus Nilsson

Avocado Crunch Tartlets

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Nasturtiums come in a rainbow of colors—yellow, orange, red—and taste like a cross between watercress and arugula. In other words, peppery with some spice, which makes the petals a natural, delicious match for earthy spring vegetables like asparagus, artichokes, and lettuce. You’ll want to eat these blooms fresh, so just sprinkle them on top of tarts, salads, grain bowls, or open-faced sandwiches. (More options: 10 Gorgeous Recipes Featuring Edible Flowers)

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Photo: Marcus Nilsson

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