This Popular Water Flosser Had a 4,000-Person Wait List — But It Just Restocked

Take your oral health care to the next level.

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Photo: Burst

Perhaps I'm alone in this sentiment, but I actually don't mind — and would go as far as to say that I like — my dentist appointments. That fresh feeling you get after a thorough cleaning? Paradise. As much as I'd love professional-level polishing every single day, besides swapping to an electric toothbrush, there didn't seem much I could do to upgrade my routine at home.

That was, until the Burst Water Flosser (Buy It, $80, amazon.com and burstoralcare.com) came onto my radar. The popular oral-care brand released its very own water flosser last year, and it almost immediately sold out, spurring a waiting list of 4,000 people. The device blasts water or mouthwash onto your teeth and into your gum line to remove stubborn plaque — the bacteria that latches onto your pearly whites, which can harden into tartar and lead to cavities and gum disease.

Bursts's water flosser is lightweight and water-resistant (yep, you can use it in the shower!), has a powerful, cordless engine, and features three settings — standard, turbo, and pulse — to get into every crack and crevice in your mouth, leaving you with fresh breath and a squeaky-clean feeling. The water tank is a breeze to fill (read: no mess), the tip is easily removable, swappable and packable, and it conveniently uses USB charging — with a single charge lasting 80 days, making it perfect for travel.

I know what you're thinking: Are at-home water flossers even worth the extra effort and price tag? According to dentists, they could take your current oral-care routine to the next level. "They do a good job at getting debris and plaque from in between your teeth," said Craig Copeland, D.M.D, from Smile Magic Family Dental. "Since regular flossing can be difficult, time-consuming, or not done at all, this is a good alternative to ensure you go in and reach areas where toothbrushes can't."

Also worth noting: The best time to use a water flosser is at nighttime before you brush. "You always want the brush to go in and get rid of all the particles you just removed out of your teeth with the water flosser, adds Copeland. (

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Burst

Buy It: Burst Water Flosser, $80, amazon.com and burstoralcare.com

I tried the Burst Water Flosser one night after snacking and was impressed — well, equally satisfied and grossed out — at how much food was dislodged from in between my teeth and gums. The spray feature was strong enough to remove particles stuck in the tightest crevices, yet gentle enough that it wasn't painful for my gums. After the first use, my mouth felt instantly cleaner. After using the water flosser for a week, I skipped a night and definitely felt my mouth wasn't as fresh before bed.

And even if I'm feeling zonked before bed, using the Burst Water Flosser couldn't be easier. Simply attach the included tip to the flosser, fill the reservoir with water, lean over the sink, stick the tip in your mouth near the gum line, and click the smiley button to get started. Keep your lips just close enough to prevent splashing and allow the water to flow from your mouth into the sink. The key is to always be sure you're aiming at your gum line! Even though it's pretty uncomplicated, Burst includes an instructional pamphlet with your flosser; however, if you're a visual person like me, the brand also has a helpful YouTube video. (

You can also choose from three water pressure settings — my everyday preference was "standard," unless I felt I needed a more intense experience, which "turbo" provided. As for tip options, the classic tips are the standard and worked great for my needs. Burst does offer two additional options: perio and ortho. The former is ideal if you prefer a gentler experience (and great for those with sensitive gums) and lets you get into tight crevices in the back of your mouth, while the latter is perfect if you have braces. Listen, as someone who wore braces for three years in high school, I would've loved to have had this option when food got stuck between my wires. (

If you're still feeling skeptical, know that I'm not the only fan. Amazon shoppers have awarded the device a solid 4.1-rating, lauding it for being powerful and easy to use, making their teeth feel cleaner after use than with regular floss, and saying that the sleek design can't be beat.

One reviewer wrote: "The Burst water flosser is a much improved version of traditional water flossers. Rather than an electrical cord, a tank, a hose and a wand, everything is self-contained in a single unit. So far it has great battery life and is very easy to use, which means I use it every day."

"I love this!!! My teeth are close together so it's tough to use string floss, but with this, my teeth and gums feel so much cleaner even before I brush! This was a great purchase, I've been recommending it to my friends and family who also have the same struggle," said another.

Several reviewers did call out that due to the water flosser's compact size, you have to refill the reservoir often while using it. When I researched water flossers, I actually wanted a smaller, cordless water flosser because some water flossers take up too much counter space. As a New Yorker with very limited bathroom storage, I needed a water flosser that could be easily stored. For me, using the standard mode, I had to refill the reservoir at least two to three times in one sitting, but it wasn't a dealbreaker since it's easy and quick to refill. (

I'll definitely keep this product as a part of my oral health routine and can't wait to show off my pearly whites to my dentist at my next appointment. While nothing replaces a professional cleaning, this comes pretty darn close. Now that the Burst Water Flosser is back in stock, you'll want to snap it up — if the 4,000-person wait list tells you anything, it's a coveted buy that is bound to sell out again.

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