French fashion companies LVMH and Kering jointly released a list of working condition standards they'll uphold for models cast by their brands.

By Renee Cherry
Updated: September 06, 2017
Photo: GP Images/Getty Images

Just in time for Fashion Week, luxury conglomerates LVMH and Kering have made a game-changing announcement: they'll no longer allow French measurement size 32 (U.S. size 0) models to walk in any of their brands' runway shows. Many household names fall under one of the two French companies, including Louis Vuitton, Céline, Fendi, Dior, Gucci, and Saint Laurent, among others.

LVMH and Kering included the ban in a list of standards the company will adhere to in the interest of models in their new charter on the working relationships with fashion models and their well-being. The charter also includes other measures in the name of their models' health, like providing a dedicated psychologist/therapist for models during their work time and requiring models to produce a certificate that they're in good health before being hired. It also bans casting underage models, which has long been a standard practice in the fashion industry.

Israel, Italy, and Spain have all passed laws requiring Fashion Week models to be over a certain BMI, and most recently, France followed suit in 2015. While neither BMI or clothing size is a definite indication of health, these requirements indicate a shift in a positive direction.

"We hope to inspire the entire industry to follow suit, thus making a real difference in the working conditions of fashion models industry-wide," Kering CEO François-Henri Pinault said in the statement.

While we're all for improving working conditions for models and eliminating unhealthy pressure to have a certain waist measurement, it might be a bit of a stretch to assume the announcement will change much in the way of size inclusivity right away. (After all, isn't size 2 bound to become the new size 0?) Though it's becoming more common, casting curvy models in a major fashion week show is still a novelty that sparks congratulatory headlines (see: Christian Siriano FW '17). But LVMH and Kering's pledge is a step in the right direction. And given their collective clout, we're optimistic it could fuel further change in the fashion industry.

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Comments (3)

solohorse
September 25, 2017
It's as hard for tiny skinny girls to find clothes as it is for some of us that are larger. Most clothes even marked small are too big.
solohorse
September 25, 2017
This is just as wrong as only hiring size 0 models. My daughter went into modeling exactly because she is so small. She is a 0 or really a 00 at 5'3". She does not diet. In fact it is hard for her to gain weight at all. She eats what she wants and has always been tiny. Not very fair to tell girls that if they are skinny they are no good, just as it isn't if they are a size 14 like me. Telling girls they are skinny ( not anorexic just small ) that they cannot model is just as mean.
solohorse
September 25, 2017
This is just as wrong as only hiring size 0 models. My daughter went into modeling exactly because she is so small. She is a 0 or really a 00 at 5'3". She does not diet. In fact it is hard for her to gain weight at all. She eats what she wants and has always been tiny. Not very fair to tell girls that if they are skinny they are no good, just as it isn't if they are a size 14 like me. Telling girls they are skinny ( not anorexic just small ) that they cannot model is just as mean.