The blast was so powerful that the lid of the car's center console blew off and shot through the sunroof.

By Faith Brar
September 24, 2019
Denys Kurbatov/Shutterstock

Dry shampoo is one of those multipurpose miracle products you've probably stashed everywhere—whether that's in your gym bag or the glove compartment of your car. (Related: The Best Post-Workout Dry Shampoo for Super Sweaty Hair)

But a recent harrowing story will make you think twice before storing your fav dry shampoo in your vehicle.

A Missouri woman named Christine Bader Debrecht, took to Facebook last week to warn people about the dangers of leaving aerosol cans in hot cars after a can of Equate Tea Tree Dry Shampoo literally exploded in her daughter's Honda Civic, NBC News reports.

"It was hot yesterday and the can exploded. It blew the console cover off of its hinges, shot through the sunroof, and went high enough in the air that it landed about 50 feet away," Debrecht wrote in the viral post. "Please don't leave aerosol cans in your car!"

Facebook

Thankfully, the explosion happened while the car was parked with no one inside, so there were no injuries.

Facebook

The scary incident serves as an important reminder to heed warning labels on aerosol products.

"Equate Dry Shampoo includes a specific warning, like most aerosol products, that it may explode if heated and not stored as directed," Walmart, which owns Equate, said in a statement to NBC News. The warning, printed on the front of the can, reads: "DANGER. Extremely flammable. Container may explode if heated."

It's not clear whether the car was parked directly in the sun, but apparently it was about 90 degrees outside the day of the explosion, according to The Washington PostConsidering the dry shampoo's label says it should be stored in temperatures under 120 degrees, and the inside of a hot car can reach as high as 130 to 172 degrees, it seems like the explosion was an accident waiting to happen.

Other common aerosol products—like hairspray, shaving cream, and even certain cleaning products—can be equally dangerous in hot environments because they often contain a flammable hydrocarbon gas called isobutane (also an ingredient in the Equate dry shampoo), which is what makes them spray.

Moral of the story: Always store your aerosol products—cosmetic or otherwise—in a cool space, and never neglect warning labels.

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