From deep breathing practices to self-compassion exercises, Pinterest is offering plenty of ways to help you relax.

By Julia Guerra
July 23, 2019
Shutterstock/Chayantorn Tongmorn

Life is hardly ever Pinterest-perfect. Anyone who uses the app knows it's true: You pin what you pine for. For some, that means cozy home decor; for others, it's the wardrobe of their dreams. Some people even search Pinterest for ways to cope with anxiety and stress. For those individuals, Pinterest created a helpful tool.

This week, Pinterest launched a series of "emotional well-being activities" that are accessible directly in the app, according to an official press release. The guided exercises were designed in partnership with emotional health experts from Brainstorm—the Stanford Lab for Mental Health Innovation—with advice from Vibrant Emotional Health as well as the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

The exercises will be available to anyone who searches Pinterest using phrases like "stress quotes," "work anxiety," or other terms that might indicate they're struggling with their mental health, the press release explained. (Related: Anxiety-Reducing Solutions for Common Worry Traps)

"In the last year there have been millions of searches in the U.S. related to emotional health on Pinterest," Annie Ta, Pinner Product Manager, wrote in the press release. "Together we wanted to create a more compassionate, actionable experience that tries to address a broader emotional spectrum of what Pinners may be looking for." (Related: Stop Stress In Just 1 Minute with These Simple Strategies)

Activities will include things like deep breathing prompts and self-compassion exercises, TechCrunch reports. But the format of this new feature will look and feel different from a traditional Pinterest feed "because the experience is kept separate," explained Ta. In other words, you won't see ads or pin recommendations based on these resources. All activity is stored via a third-party service, according to the press release.

Pinterest's new feature will be available to everyone in the U.S. on both iOS and Android devices in the upcoming weeks, per the press release. Note, while these activities are great for in-the-moment use, they are not meant to replace professional help, wrote Ta.

If you are struggling with thoughts of suicide, you can contact Crisis Text Line by texting "START" to 741-741 or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. For more information on suicide prevention and awareness, visit the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

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