You are here

These Women Are Fighting Back Against Disney's Lack of Body Diversity

Disney princesses aren't exactly known for body diversity, which is why two body-positive influencers are asking Disney to create a princess who looks like them. (Related: Disney's New #DreamBigPrincess Photo Campaign Is the Goal-Crushing Motivation You Need)

 

How amazing would it be if there was more representation in media? If children were able to watch cartoons with diversity in? How much more would we achieve if we didn’t spend so much time hating our bodies? I’ve lost days of my life fantasising about being smaller, counting calories and obsessing over any bit of me that wobbled. Like it or not, our perception of ourselves is tied to how we see people like us being treated. We see fat being treated as undesirable so we assume it is. We see being desired as a goal, and so we do whatever we can to reach that goal - regardless of how detrimental it may be to our mental health. And when we fail on whatever diet we put ourselves on, we feel worse about ourselves. It’s a vicious cycle. That’s why I want a fat princess. Not a princess whose story is about being fat. A princess who has all of the amazing adventures that her predecessors had while being fat. We need representation of all the magnificent and wildly different bodies there are, and stories that don’t primarily focus on that. Sure, show the struggles that different bodies may face, but don’t reduce these vibrant and brilliant characters to their bodies. My princess companion is the amazing @scarrednotscared and the photo was taken by the glorious @the_feeding_of_the_fox 

A post shared by amyeloise (@amyeloisew) on

"How amazing would it be if there was more representation in media? If children were able to watch cartoons with diversity in [them]? How much more would we achieve if we didn't spend so much time hating our bodies?" body-positive activist Amy Eloise recently shared on Instagram.

She explains that our perceptions of ourselves are often tied to the way people treat us—and that when we see non-straight-sized people being treated as undesirable, we tend to think the same. "We see being desired as a goal, and so we do whatever we can to reach that goal—regardless of how detrimental it may be to our mental health. And when we fail on whatever diet we put ourselves on, we feel worse about ourselves. It's a vicious cycle," she said in the post.

That's why Amy wants to see a "fat princess." And the princess' story can't revolve around her weight. Amy feels that we need "a princess who has all of the amazing adventures of her predecessors"—just a different body type. "We need representation of all the magnificent and wildly different bodies there are, and stories that don't primarily focus on that." (Related: Katie Willcox Wants You to Know You're So Much More Than What You See In the Mirror)

Amy's friend and body-positive activist Michelle Elman mirrored similar emotions, saying: "How incredible would it be for little kids to grow up and instead of saying 'I want to look like her!' they could say 'Wow, she looks like me!' How incredible would it be if the epitome of beauty and the envy of many little girls wasn't so equated to thinness?"

 

WE NEED A FAT PRINCESS. Growing up with Disney, my heart hurt a little. None of them looked like me but you know what made me feel worse? Scar from the lion king. This is just the beginning of the life long stigma against scars. Think about how many villains have scars! Then I got older, and I got bigger with each surgery. At 7, my head and stomach were already covered in scars and I was already bigger than my friends. Disney princesses are seen as the epitome of beauty and even as a young girl, I quickly learnt that meant I wasn’t beautiful. This was emphasised even more when we shopped for princess birthday parties. There were never any in my size. Things haven’t really changed. It was sooo hard for @amyeloisew and I to find these in our sizes. I actually wanted to be jasmine so I could be a Scarred princess but no surprises that people still continue to assume fat women don’t wear crop tops. How incredible would it be for little kids to grow up and instead of saying “I want to look like her!”, they could say “wow she looks like me!”. How incredible would it be if the epitome of beauty and the envy of many little girls wasn’t so equated to thinness? Until @disney makes that happen, Amy and I would be honoured to fill the childhood dream you never knew you wanted of having a fat (and Scarred, although you can’t see it!) princess. #ScarredNotScared : @the_feeding_of_the_fox

A post shared by Michelle Elman (@scarrednotscared) on

Take note, Disney. Here's hoping we start seeing more realistic and curvy princesses in the future.

Comments

Add a comment