"This journey has been everything from heartbreaking, to confusing, and pretty dark," she shared.

By Faith Brar
April 29, 2021
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Credit: Getty Images

Tone It Up co-founder Katrina Scott has never shied away from being vulnerable with her fans. She's opened up about the importance of prioritizing mental health and has been candid about the realities of new motherhood. Now, she's sharing something even more personal: her struggle with secondary infertility.

Scott recently took to Instagram to share a heartbreaking post about why she's been so quiet on social media as of late. "This is a little glimpse of what our world has looked like lately," she shared alongside a reel showing exactly how challenging it's been trying to get pregnant again.

The clip is a compilation of videos where Scott is administrating what appears to be IVF hormone injections into her stomach, either herself or with the help of family and friends. At one point, even her 2-year-old daughter Isabel is seen consoling her and kissing her stomach where she's just received an injection. "This journey has been everything from heartbreaking to confusing, and pretty dark," Scott wrote alongside the reel. "But it has shown me the beauty in hope, humanity, and healing. I truly wouldn't have had the courage to keep pushing through without all of you, my family, friends, and incredible doctors and nurses." (Related: No, the COVID Vaccine Doesn't Cause Infertility)

Secondary infertility, or the inability to get pregnant after easily conceiving your first child, isn't talked about as much primary infertility — but it affects an estimated three million women in the U.S. (Note: While Scott never straight-up said getting pregnant the first time was a breeze, she also didn't document any sort of fertility journey for that pregnancy.)

"Secondary infertility can be very frustrating and confusing for a couple who got pregnant quickly in the past," Jessica Rubin, an ob-gyn based in New York previously told Shape. "I always remind my patients that it can take a normal, healthy couple a full year to get pregnant, so not to use the amount of time they tried to get pregnant previously as a yardstick, especially when it was three months or less." (Related: What Ob-Gyns Wish Women Knew About Their Fertility)

In a March 2021 post on her blog, Live Beautifully, Scott shared that she had suffered two miscarriages in 2020. Afterward, "we had decided not to do IVF just yet," she wrote in the post. "We almost went that route in January, but our doctor advised us to try once more." Then, she experienced a chemical pregnancy, the clinical term for an early miscarriage, which occurs when you're just two or three weeks pregnant. It appears that, since then, they've decided to try IVF. "One of the hardest things I've ever had to do was walk into a fertility clinic after our losses and say I needed support," she wrote in the Instagram post. "But as soon as I looked around the waiting room, I realized we're never alone. It can be so isolating when we hold things inside... but really, we're all in this together."

"I don't know what the future holds for our family, but each day I hold onto hope, faith, and love," she continued. (Related: How I Learned to Trust My Body After a Miscarriage)

Knowing how difficult the process has been, Scott used her platform to offer some words of support to other infertility warriors, letting them know that they're not alone. "To anyone experiencing loss, trauma, fertility struggles...or even uncertainty in their ability to overcome obstacles, I want you to know there's always a light shining on you," she shared. "Keep your head up, your heart forward, and never forget that you are worthy of a beautiful story. It's okay to ask for help and to say you need support."

While keeping the details vague, Scott did leave her fans with a small update of what's next in her journey. "My egg retrieval is today, so I'll be resting and recovering," she wrote. ICYDK, during the IVF process, eggs are retrieved from your ovaries, fertilized by sperm in a lab, and then the fertilized egg(s) are transferred to your uterus, according to the Mayo Clinic. "I just want you to all know I'm so thankful for your prayers and support," she continued. "Brian and I feel it and it gives us more strength than we can ever put into words."

In response to her vulnerability, several members of the fitness community shared their love.

Fitness influencer Anna Victoria, who herself has struggled with fertility, offered Scott her support in the comments section. "So so proud of you for sharing this," the trainer wrote. "Hope your egg retrieval went great and the post-retrieval bloat isn't too bad or painful. It will all be worth it!!!" (Related: Anna Victoria's Postpartum Journey Inspired Her to Launch New Programs On Her Fitness App)

Fellow trainer, Hannah Bronfman also shared some kind words writing: "Sharing your personal story will help so many women. Proud of your journey and I'm holding space for you and all the IVF warriors out there!"

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